CAO Daily Editorial analysis for UPSC IAS 26th-January, 2018

Current Affairs Only Daily Editorial Analysis for Competitive Exams


26th Jan, 2018

Archives


Training teachers {Education Policy}

(The Hindu)


Context

This article talks about an Amendment Bill that seeks to better the lot of teachers.

Institutions which impart teacher training courses have failed to get the necessary recognition from the National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE).

The future of those who graduate from such institutions, which are funded by the Central/ State government or Union Territory administration concerned, has been in jeopardy.

The NCTE (Amendment) Bill, 2017

  • The Bill amends the National Council for Teacher Education Act, 1993.  The Act establishes the National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE).  The NCTE plans and co-ordinates the development of the teacher education system throughout the country.  It also ensures the maintenance of norms and standards in the teacher education system.

    Key features of the 2017 Bill include

    Retrospective recognition of certain teacher education institutions:

The Bill seeks to grant retrospective recognition to institutions:

(i)                  Notified by the central government,

(ii)                Funded by the central government or state/union territory government,

(iii)              Which do not have recognition under the Act,

(iv)               Which must have offered teacher education courses on or after the establishment of the NCTE until the academic year 2017-2018.

          Retrospective permission to start new courses

The Bill also seeks to grant retrospective permission to start a new course or training in teacher education to institutions:

(i)                  Notified by the central government,

(ii)                Funded by the central government or state/union territory government,

(iii)              Which have satisfied certain conditions required for the conduct of a new course or training in Teacher education,

(iv)               Which must have offered teacher education courses on or after the establishment of the NCTE until the academic year 2017-2018.


Should euthanasia be allowed?  {Rights Issues}

(The Hindu)


Context

Narayan Lavate (88) and Iravati Lavate (78) from Maharashtra say that they do not wish to be a burden on society in their old age. They don’t have children and their siblings are no more, they say. They argue that spending the country’s scarce resources on keeping them alive, the old and ailing alive, is a criminal waste.

Euthanasia

Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide refer to deliberate action taken with the intention of ending a life, in order to relieve persistent suffering.

Euthanasia: A doctor is allowed by law to end a person’s life by a painless means, as long as the patient and their family agree.

Assisted suicide: A doctor assists a patient to commit suicide if they request it.

Voluntary and involuntary euthanasia

Voluntary euthanasia is conducted with consent. Voluntary euthanasia is currently legal in Belgium, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland, and the states of Oregon and Washington in the U.S.

Involuntary euthanasia is euthanasia is conducted without consent. The decision is made by another person, because the patient is unable to make the decision.

Passive and active euthanasia

Passive euthanasia is when life-sustaining treatments are withheld. The definitions are not precise. If a doctor prescribes increasing doses of strong painkilling medications, such as opioids, this may eventually be toxic for the patient. Some may argue that this is passive euthanasia.

Others, however, would say this is not euthanasia, because there is no intention to take life.

Active euthanasia is when someone uses lethal substances or forces to end a patient’s life, whether by the patient or somebody else.

Active euthanasia is more controversial, and it is more likely to involve religious, moral, ethical, and compassionate arguments.

Living wills

A living will – also known as an advance directive – is a legal document that specifies the type of medical care that an individual does or does not want in the event that he is unable to communicate his wishes.

In the case of an unconscious person who suffers from a terminal illness or a life-threatening injury, doctors and hospitals consult his living will to determine whether or not the patient wants life-sustaining treatment, such as assisted breathing or tube feeding. In the absence of a living will, decisions about medical care become the responsibility of the spouse, family members or other third parties. These individuals may be unaware of the patient’s desires, or they may not wish to follow the patient’s unwritten, verbal directives.


Print Friendly, PDF & Email
We will be happy to hear your thoughts

      Leave a reply

      Current Affairs ONLY
      Register New Account
      Reset Password