CAO Weekly News Roundup- November WEEK -03

Conference of Parties (Cop23) – Bonn {International Relation}


In news

  • It is alliance that has been declared at the current Bonn session– which intends to facilitate a shift to sustainable fuels.
  • Notably, India is systematically replacing its public buses with an electric fleet and plans to go electric for all vehicles by 2030.
  • Laws to raise the energy efficiency of vehicles would work well if supported with financial incentives.

What is ‘Transport Decarbonisation Alliance’?

  • It is alliance that has been declared at the current Bonn session– which intends to facilitate a shift to sustainable fuels.
  • This envisions a framework for getting cities to commit to eco-friendly mobility.
  • This will also improve the quality of urban life for citizens.
  • Notably, India is systematically replacing its public buses with an electric fleet and plans to go electric for all vehicles by 2030.
  • Such measures will have a beneficial effect not just on transport choices, but on public health through pollution abatement.
  • Laws to raise the energy efficiency of vehicles would work well if supported with financial incentives.

India’s advances towards its targets?

  • India’s pledged to reduce the intensity of its greenhouse gas emissions per unit of GDP by 20-25% from 2005 levels by 2020.
  • This commitment was made in Copenhagen in 2009 and has been progressing positively.
  • The pledges made in the Paris pact of 2015 are also proceeding according to the envisioned targets.
  • 40% share of renewable energy is targeted by 2030 – which would be in line with emission intensity for GDP growth of 7% or less.
  • Notably, generating 175 gigawatts of renewable power by 2022 is already underway.
  • India could further raise its ambition in the use of green technologies, which would mark it as a global climate leader.

Challenges

  • The impact of extreme weather events such as droughts and floods on economic growth hasn’t been enumerated.
  • In this context, the rich countries must give up their rigid approach towards the demands of low and middle-income countries.
  • There is also some worry that an increase in coal, oil and gas production could negate some of the gains made.

Opportunities

  • The climate question presents a leapfrog era for ushering in a new era of innovation and growth.
  • Hence, projects have to be decisively pursued and barriers for wider adoption of renewable need to be taken down.

 India hosts first APCERT conference {Digitalization}


Context

The Indian Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT-In) under the aegis of Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology organizing the Asia Pacific Computer Emergency Response Team (APCERT) Conference from November 12-15, 2017 in New Delhi.

This is the 15th Conference of APCERT and first ever conference in India and South Asia and will be attended by 21 economies.

Key PointsRelated image

This conference would cover contemporary topics around strategies of CERTs, Technology and Instruments for building trust in digitally evolving economies and best practices for handling cyber security in mobile and social media.

The conference theme is “Building Trust in the Digital Economy”.

About APCERT

What is it?

APCERT (Asia Pacific Computer Emergency Response Team) is a coalition of CSIRTs (Computer Security Incident Response Teams), from 13 economies across the Asia Pacific region. APCERT organizes an annual meeting called APSIRC conference, and the first conference was held in March 2002, Tokyo, Japan.

Membership: Any CSIRT from Asia Pacific Region, who is interested to furthering the objectives of APCERT, will be allowed to join as APCERT members after meeting all member accreditation requirements.

 APCERT membership model has 2 levels

Full members

Full Members are CSIRTs/CERTs in the Asia Pacific region, who have the right to vote on APCERT issues, as well as to stand for election to the APCERT Steering Committee. All Founding Members are Full Members.

General Members

Any CSIRTs/CERTs in the Asia Pacific region with an interest in incident response and IT security, can join APCERT as a General Member. General Members are not eligible to vote nor to stand for election to the APCERT Steering Committee.

An applicant is required to join APCERT as a General Member first. After applicants obtain a General Member status, they can later apply to upgrade their membership to a Full Member status. General Membership is a pre-requisite to become a Full Member.

CERT-In (the Indian Computer Emergency Response Team)

It is a government-mandated information technology (IT) security organization. CERT-In was created by the Indian Department of Information Technology in 2004 and operates under the auspices of that department.

It’s purpose

The purpose of CERT-In is to respond to computer security incidents, report on vulnerabilities and promote effective IT security practices throughout the country. According to the provisions of the Information Technology Amendment Act 2008, CERT-In is responsible for overseeing administration of the Act.


 Warm water  {Biodiversity}


Rising seawater temperature as a result of climate change is one of the most serious causes of stress to corals throughout the world.

  • When temperature is too high, the relationship between corals and their symbiotic microalgae breaks down.
  • The algae are what give corals some of their bright colours (red,orange,yellow etc) so when this happens, corals appear white or bleached.
  • Just one degree above the typical summer temperature is enough to bleach many corals.
  • High temperature allows corals to become sick more easily, a sick coral’s appearance, like black band, white band, white spots.

Ocean AcidificationImage result for Ocean Acidification

  • Carbon dioxide (CO2) also has adverse effects on the oceans.
  • Recently, ocean acidification has emerged as another potential serious threat to coral reefs. Seawater absorbs some of the excess CO2 from the atmosphere, causing the oceans to become more acidic.
  • These acidic conditions dissolve coral skeletons, which make up the structure of the reef and make it more difficult for corals to grow.

Overfishing

  • Fishing using cyanide and dynamite
  • Pollution from sewage and agriculture
  • Massive outbreaks of predatory starfish and invasive species
  • Sedimentation from poor land use practices.

 Glory of Kakatiya-era temple unveiled {Art & Culture}


The 800 year old Sri Kasi Visweswara Temple, belongs to the kakatiya period, is located in Medak district in Telangana.

The capital of kakatiya dynasty is Warangal.Image result for Kakatiya-era temple

Eastern Chalukyas preceded kakatiyas and Bahmani sultanate succeeded it which was subsequently conquered by Vijayanagar Empire and Delhi Sultanate in the later period.

Rudrama Devi of this dynasty reigned around 1262–1289 CE.

The archaeological department has excavated the parts of the temple that remained buried.

Temple has been a site of religious significance, place to worship the presiding deity, Lord Shiva.


Railways to start 9-month ‘upskilling’ exercise for employees {Development}


Project Saksham

It aims to upgrade the skillsets of its 13 lakh-strong workforce with a single drive spanning nine months. The nature of the short-duration training will range from refresher courses, with an eye on evolved global practices in the respective areas, to skills in the existing lining of functioning.

The nature of the short-duration training will range from refresher courses, with an eye on evolved global practices in the respective areas, to skills in the existing lining of functioning, sources said

Groups of railway officers are going to Japan to train in various processes of the Shinkansen bullet train and heavy haul technologies.

Employees from the rank of a peon to the Railway Board Members and everyone in between will undergo the training.


 First fauna survey begins in Krishna sanctuary {Biodiversity}


  • It is a wildlife sanctuary located in Andhra Pradesh.
  • It falls in Krishna and Guntur districts.
  • With an area of 194.8 km, it lies between the Bay of Bengal and the Krishna river.
  • It is one of the rarest eco-regions in the world because it harbours vast tracts of pristine mangrove forest.
  • In 1998, it was declared as wildlife sanctuary and since then no survey on the fauna had been carried out.
  • In 2014-16, a pilot project was carried out in which 15 fishing cats were recorded.
  • Population of fishing cat has increased in KWS due to the conservation of the mangroves.
  • As per the Forest Report 2015, there has been a net increase of 17 sq. km. of mangrove forest cover in Krishna district since 2013.

 Status Survey

  • To have an authentic data on presence of the wildlife is the need of an hour to prepare conservation strategies.
  • Thus, a six-month status survey is being carried out by installing camera traps in the most strategic 20 wildlife grids.
  • The survey will proceed by carrying out Fishing Cat census.
  • It also includes geo-tagging of the wildlife, particularly the fishing cat.

 Fishing Cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) Image result for  Fishing Cat

  • It is a feline with a powerful build and stocky legs.
  • It is about twice the size of a typical house cat and is nocturnal in nature.
  • It is an adept swimmer and enters water frequently to prey on fish.
  • Apart from fish, it also preys on frogs, crustaceans, snakes, birds and scavenges on carcasses of larger animals.

 Habitat

  • Wetlands are the favourite habitats of the fishing cats.
  • In India, fishing cats are mainly found in the mangrove forests of the Sundarbans, on the foothills of the Himalayas along the Ganga and Brahmaputra river valleys and in the Western Ghats.
  • It is a state animal of West Bengal.

 Threats

  • Some of the threats faced by the fishing cats are
  • Destruction of wetlands
  • Depletion of its main prey-fish due to unsustainable fishing practices
  • Poaching (for its skin)
  • Indiscriminate trapping, snaring and poisoning

Current Status

  • On IUCN red list, it is classified as ‘Vulnerable’.
  • On Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) lists, it is placed in Appendix II part of Article IV.
  • In India,it is included in Schedule I of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 and thereby protected from hunting.

 

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