UPSC Prelims-2017 Special MCQ-4 (Polity): Answer with Explanation

Answer with Explanation for Polity- Special MCQ-4



Q1. Correct Answer : D

Explanation:

Statement 1: The President appoints the CAG, CEC of India and Chairman of UPSC. So, 1 is wrong.

Statement 2: The expenses of these bodies and their office holders e.g. CAG of India, are charged on the consolidated fund of India. So, 2 is wrong.

Statement 3: They are legal entities and can be sued just as the government can be sued.

Statement 4: The government can initiate disciplinary action against the office holders for malpractices, corruption etc. So, 4 is also wrong.

The Constitution ensures the independence of these bodies through various provisions like security of tenure, fixed service conditions, expenses being charged on the Consolidated Fund of India, and so on.

Q Source:

Chapter 3: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q2. Correct Answer : D

Explanation:

  • The Act divided the provincial subjects into two parts transferred and reserved.
  • The transferred subjects were to be administered by the governor with the aid of ministers responsible to the legislative Council.
  • The reserved subjects, on the other hand, were to be administered by the governor and his executive council without being responsible to the legislative Council.
  • This dual scheme of governance was known as ‘diarchy’-a term derived from the Greek word diarchy which means double rule. However, this experiment was largely unsuccessful.

Q Source:

Chapter 1: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q3. Correct Answer : A

Explanation:

  • The topic has been covered in previous tests also.
  • All the members of the commission were British and hence, all the parties boycotted the commission.
  • The commission submitted its report in 1930 (Recommendations have been covered in previous tests).
  • To consider the proposals of the commission, the British Government convened three round table conferences of the representatives of the British Government, British India and Indian princely states.
  • On the basis of these discussions, a ‘White Paper on Constitutional Reforms’ was prepared and submitted for the consideration of the Joint Select Committee of the British Parliament.
  • The recommendations of this committee were incorporated (with certain changes) in the next Government of India Act of 1935.

Q Source:

Chapter 1: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q4. Correct Answer : A

Explanation:

  • Responsible government is a system which embodies the principle of parliamentary accountability, such as in India.
  • It is also the foundation of the Westminster system of parliamentary democracy.
  • Government is responsible to the parliament rather than to the monarch, or, in a colonial context, to the imperial government.
  • If the parliament is bicameral, then the government is responsible first to the parliament’s lower house, which is more numerous, directly elected and thus more representative than the upper house.

Q Source:

Chapter 1: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q5. Correct Answer : D

Explanation:

The Constituent Assembly also performed the following functions:

 It ratified the India’s membership of the Commonwealth in May 1949.

 It adopted the national flag on July 22, 1947.

 It adopted the national anthem on January 24, 1950.

 It adopted the national song on January 24, 1950.

 It elected Dr Rajendra Prasad as the first President of India on January 24, 1950.

Q Source:

Chapter 2: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q6. Correct Answer : C

Explanation:

  • The usual features of a federation, viz., two government, division of powers, written Constitution, supermacy of Constitution, rigidity of Constitution, independent judiciary and bicameralism.
  • However, the Indian Constitution also contains a large number of unitary or nonfederal features, viz., a strong Centre, single Constitution, single citizenship, flexibility of Constitution, integrated judiciary, appointment of state governor by the Centre, all-India services, emergency provisions, and so on.

Q Source:

Chapter 3: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q7. Correct Answer : A

Explanation:

  • It is issued by a higher court to a lower court or tribunal either to transfer a case pending with the latter to itself or to squash the order of the latter in a case. It is issued on the grounds of excess of jurisdiction or lack of jurisdiction or error of law.
  • Thus, unlike prohibition, which is only preventive, certiorari is both preventive as well as curative. Certiorari is not available against legislative bodies and private individuals or bodies.

Q Source:

Chapter 7: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q8. Correct Answer : C

Explanation:

  • The Supreme Court is a federal court, the highest court of appeal, the guarantor of the fundamental rights of the citizens and the guardian of the Constitution.
  • Under Article 32 of the constitution, a citizen can approach the Supreme Court in case of infringement of fundamental rights.
  • The SC can enforce the fundamental right by issuing orders to the concerned authority. NHRC only investigates cases of human rights violations; it is not the guarantor of fundamental rights.

Q Source:

Chapter 3: Indian Polity: M Laxmikanth


Q9. Correct Answer : C

Explanation:

  • The people of India were given eight months to discuss the draft and propose amendments. In the light of the public comments, criticisms and suggestions, the Drafting Committee prepared a second draft, which was published in October 1948.
  • Some provisions of the Constitution pertaining to citizenship, elections, provisional parliament, temporary and transitional provisions, and short title contained in Articles 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 60, 324, 366, 367, 379, 380, 388, 391, 392 and 393 came into force on November 26, 1949 itself.

Q10. Correct Answer : D

Explanation:

  • The Constitution of India is the lengthiest of all the written constitutions of the world. It is a very comprehensive, elaborate and detailed document. Originally (1949), the Constitution contained a Preamble, 395 Articles (divided into 22 Parts) and 8 Schedules. Presently (2013), it consists of a Preamble, about 465 Articles (divided into 25 Parts) and 12 Schedules. The various amendments carried out since 1951 have deleted about 20 Articles and one Part (VII) and added about 85 Articles, four Parts (IVA, IXA, IXB and XIVA) and four Schedules (9, 10, 11 and 12). No other Constitution in the world has so many Articles and Schedules.
  • Centre-state relations have been given in so much detail containing even the minutest of provisions of taxation, administration and finances. For e.g. which taxes will be appropriated by either centre or state has been given in the constitution.
  • Similarily, 5th and 6h schedule areas have not only been defined and demarcated by the constitution, but also several administrative provisions like tribal advisory council; power of Gram sabhas in those areas etc. have also been provided.
  • Four factors have contributed to the elephantine size of our Constitution. They are:

(a) Geographical factors, that is, the vastness of the country and its diversity.

(b) Historical factors, e.g., the influence of the Government of India Act of 1935, which was bulky.

(c) Single Constitution for both the Centre and the states except Jammu and Kashmir4.

(d) Dominance of legal luminaries in the Constituent Assembly.


arrowright2blackUPSC Prelims-2017 Special MCQ-1 (Polity)

arrowright2blackUPSC Prelims-2017 Special MCQ-2 (Polity)

arrowright2blackUPSC Prelims-2017 Special MCQ-3 (Polity)

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